EMPLOYERS: You Can Use the Current Form I-9 until 01/21/2017

USCIS will publish a new Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification by November 22, 2016. As such, employers can continue to use the current Form I-9, dated 03/08/2013 until 01/21/2017. On or before 01/21/17, employers must use the new form.

DOL Finds that in Certain Circumstances You Can Deduct H-1B Visa Fees from Employee Paycheck

The U.S. Department of Labor, Office of the Administrative Law Judges (OALJ), has determined that in certain circumstances, an employer can deduct H-1B visa fees from an employee’s final paycheck.

In this case, Matter of Woodmen of the World Life Insurance Society, October 26, 2016, the OALJ determined that Woodmen Life did not violate any DOL regulation by deducting $5800 from the employee’s final payment for reimbursement of H-1B attorney and filing fees pursuant to an agreement which was entered into voluntarily by the employee.

Although the DOL found that §655.731(c)(9), which speaks to “authorized deductions from an employee’s required wage and specifically prohibits an employer from seeking recoupment of H-1B attorney fees and expenses from the required wage, even if the employee consents” was not applicable to this case since the deduction for the attorney’s fees came from the benefits side of the equation and not from the employee’s required wage, the DOL’s stated that the regulation is “far too broad and not supported by the plain language of the regulation.” The DOL further clarified that “an H-1B employer is prohibited from imposing its business expenses on the H-1B worker – including attorney fees and other expenses associated with the filing of an LCA and H-1B petition – only to the extent that the assessment would reduce the H-1b worker’s pay below the required wage, i.e. the higher of the prevailing wage and the actual wage.”

DHS Increases Immigration Filing Fees by 21%

DHS is increasing filing fees on immigration and naturalization applications adjudicated by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. DHS explained that the fee increase is necessary to account for costs of adjudicating services. According to DHS, the current fees do not recover the full costs associated with the adjudication of these applications and the fee increase will help continue “adequate service.” The last time USCIS fees were increased was on November 23, 2010. Under the final published rule, DHS will increase the fees by a weighted average of 21%. The fee increase will take place by December 23, 2016. Applications filed or postmarked on or after December 23, 2016, will need to include the new correct filing fee. If you are thinking of filing an application with USCIS, you may want to file now.

ITServe Alliance’s Synergy Conference 2016

Cadence Moore will be a speaker at ITServe Alliance’s annual Synergy Conference in Frisco, TX on November 10th and 11th. Cadence will be speaking about the immigration options for corporate clients in the information technology field. If you are attending, please make sure you attend her event.

By |October 20th, 2016|Events|0 Comments|

Don’t take a chance when filing a PERM case.

The Board of Alien Labor Certification Appeals (BALCA) recently ordered a PERM Labor Certification application to be certified following the Certifying Officer’s denial due to a salary range mismatch between the PERM application and the Notice of Filing.

In re Institute for Environmental Health, Inc., 2013-PERM-01963 (BALCA 2016) involved the classic PERM situation where a discrepancy between what was listed on the 9089 and prefilling recruitment/notice documentation leads to a denial. The employer in this case attested on the 9089 that the prevailing wage was $25,022.40 and that the offered wage was $25,023. However, on the notice of filing the employer listed a salary range of $25,023 to $34,837.

Given the exacting requirements of the PERM process lawyers generally aim to have their recruitment mirror the requirements listed on the 9089. The so called “matchy-matchy” doctrine has aided many lawyers navigating tricky PERM waters. In this case, BALCA ruled that the regulations is “clear and unambiguous” on allowing a salary range in the notice of filing even though the 9089 only listed the offered wage.

I suspect the Board’s action (three years after the initial denial) saving this PERM from floundering was well received by the employer. I also suspect that when counsel of record files another PERM case they will match their 9089 and recruitment / notices.

Even if one is ultimately correct and wins on appeal, knowing how cases are handled by DOL officers will save employers heartaches and legal fees. For guidance on your PERM application, contact Hammond Law Group.

By |October 18th, 2016|Green Cards|0 Comments|

DOL Issues Guidance on Recruitment Reports

The Department of Labor (“DOL”) recently released a FAQ on the information that should be included in recruitment reports. Recruitment reports are required to be prepared as part of the process of preparing a labor certification to be filed. The DOL specified that a recruitment report must include: (1) the total number of U.S. applicants who applied for the position, (2) the total number of U.S. applicants hired for the position, and (3) the total number of U.S. applicants who were rejected based upon a lawful job-related reason. The lawful job-related reasons for rejecting U.S. workers should be categorized. The DOL further specified that employers should list the total number of U.S. applicants who were interviewed and a list of the names of U.S. workers who were rejected under each category. Finally, if an applicant was rejected under multiple categories, the category that he is listed under must state the multiple bases of rejection. For instance, if a candidate was rejected because he did not have the necessary education and did not have the required total years of experience, he should fall under a category titled “candidates lacking the required education and experience.” The DOL specified that this type of categorization will “enable the certifying officer to clearly establish the reason for disqualification of each U.S. worker.”

November Visa Bulletin

The Department of State (DOS) has released the November Visa Bulletin. There was no change in the “dates for filing chart”. The “final action date” chart saw significant movement in the India and PRC EB2 categories and in the Philippines EB3 category.

By |October 16th, 2016|Green Cards|0 Comments|

American Staffing Association’s Staffing World 2016

Cadence Moore and Dwight Myfelt will be speakers at the American Staffing Association’s Staffing World in San Diego, CA from October 25th through October 27th. Cadence and Dwight will be speaking about recruiting in social media that will be part of the Thursday afternoon session. If you are attending, please make sure you attend one of their events.

By |October 14th, 2016|Events|0 Comments|

TechServe Alliance Annual Conference

Mike Hammond will be a speaker at the TechServe Alliance Annual Conference on Amelia Island, Nov 3rd-5th. Mike will be part of a legal panel focusing on compliance for IT and engineering staffing firms that will be part of the Fri afternoon session. He will be a facilitator at the opening session, Ultimate National Meet-Up on Thurs. and will host an industry “expert” lunch roundtable on Sat. If you are attending, please make sure you attend one of his events.

L-1 RFE’s are handed out inconsistently between Service Centers?

The Service’s annual 2016 report to the Ombudsman was recently release and contained concerning information for L-1 visa petitioners. Unfortunately, the RFE rates of L-1 visas appear to continue to have no rhyme or reason.

“L-1A RFE data shows inverse trending between the CSC and the VSC. For example, CSC’s L-1A rates surged to 55 percent in FY 2015, its highest level in 20 years, while in the same period, VSC’s rate dropped dramatically from a high of 44.6 percent in FY 2014, to 29 percent in FY 2015. The number of L-1B RFEs dropped in FY 2015 at both service centers, to 44 percent at the CSC and 33 percent at the VSC.” See Ombudsman Report p. 59.

The L-1 memo, L-1B Policy Guidance Memorandum, was supposed to help alleviate some of this uncertainty. “It does not appear that RFE rates in FY 2015 were affected by this guidance, as it did not become final until August 17, 2015.” See Ombudsman Report p. 59. A very small sample size granted, but this memo was supposed to be seminal in the L-1 category. I’ll be eagerly anticipating next year’s report. What we can take away is that it looks like you’ll have a slightly better chance of getting an L-1A through Vermont and that L-1B’s RFE’s have dropped but not as much as we were hoping for when the L-1B Policy Guidance Memo was released.